"Security is Mortals' Chiefest Enemy" -Shakespeare

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Ricardo Lagos asks himself, who is the one that makes the rules: the market, the state institutions or society? His answer: during a point in history, the market was the one which imposed rules in society, on the other side it was the state institutions which commanded in communist regimes. The third element mentioned is society, but to our concern, the medias should be included as a forth actor in our reality. New medias and information technology have the capacity to induce a determined vision of the world. Not only the agenda setting, but also our colloquial conversations are influenced by the topics imposed by the powers of media. Our fears in society can be conditioned to these factors of power.  At a certain level, exaggerated security for some can produce insecurity for others.

So, tell us,

What is security for you?

What makes you safe?